Archive for The Thing

Strange Tales #124: Flamin’ ‘Eck 50

Posted in Flamin' 'Eck with tags , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2015 by quizlacey
Strange Tales #124, page 3, panel 1

Strange Tales #124, page 3, panel 1

Strange Tales #124: Flamin’ ‘Eck 50

Written by: Smilin’ Stan Lee

Illustrated by: Darlin’ Dick Ayers

Inked by: Peerless P. Reinman

Lettered by: Adorable Art Simek

As we make our way through the final 10-or-so issues of Johnny Storm’s solo adventures in Strange Tales, we’re going to see logic (not a quality seen in abundance, admittedly) become scarcer and scarcer. Here’s a good example of a panel which should never have been drawn, and which should have been picked up by anyone involved in the creative process from the penciling onwards.

Having had half of his house destroyed by The Thing’s refusal to use the front door, Johnny then decides to some on-the-spot spot-welding to repair the damage. So, he uses his intense heat and flame to repair his very obviously wooden house.

Check out our coverage of Strange Tales #124 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]
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Strange Tales #124: Property Damage 31 / Flamin’ ‘Eck 49

Posted in Flamin' 'Eck, Property Damage with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2015 by quizlacey
Strange Tales 124, page 1, panel 4

Strange Tales 124, page 1, panel 4

Strange Tales #124: Property Damage 31 / Flamin’ ‘Eck 49

Written by: Smilin’ Stan Lee

Illustrated by: Darlin’ Dick Ayers

Inked by: Peerless P. Reinman

Lettered by: Adorable Art Simek

Our streak of The Thing destroying everything in his wake continues as we return to our favourite Silver Age punching bag, Strange Tales. This opening sequence sees Ben decide to give Johnny a wake-up call by… er… lifting a side of his house off its foundations, presumably destroying the structural stability of the house. Judging by the way that rear wall doesn’t change angle, there has to be a massive gaping crack somewhere along the side of the house as well. As Andy most likely said at the time, this makes no sense. And it still doesn’t.

We’ve also got yet another flaming lasso, easily my least-favourite thing in the entirety of Strange Tales (and beyond, as evidenced by its appearance in the comic covered on this week’s episode). At least this is 1964, and we can pretty much guarantee that the walls are lined with asbestos, explaining why Johnny can throw his flame around in such a cavalier fashion.

Check out our coverage of Strange Tales #124 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]

 

Fantastic Four #30: Property Damage 30

Posted in Property Damage with tags , , , , , , , on October 19, 2015 by quizlacey
Fantastic Four #30, page 21, panel 5

Fantastic Four #30, page 21, panel 5

Fantasticast Four #30: Property Damage 30

Written by: Stan Lee (A rather nice writer)

Illustrated by: Jack Kirby (A quite noteworthy artist)

Inked by: Chic Stone (A somewhat nifty inker)

Lettered by: Art Simek (An occasionally neat letterer)

This is why I should read ahead… It turns out that a suit of armour is a fairly minor piece of property damage when compared to the completely accidental loss of an entire artefact-filled castle. I really wish I had the ability to put a conjectural price on the loss of the castle, much as people have done with the destruction to Metropolis and New York in Man of Steel and Avengers. So many one-of-a-kind antiques lost forever, as well as the unique alchemical knowledge of Diablo.

Talking of Diablo, he really is one of the lesser Lee/Kirby villains to have gone on and feature within the Marvel universe. He’s one of my least-favourite, even though his origin story far outweighed my expectations. It’s not that the gimmick of the villain doesn’t work for, it’s that it’s so horribly mis-applied. Instead of being a genuine, rare mystical villain for the team, he often gets reduced to an unlikely potion master, with coloured liquids causing all sorts of strange things to happen. He’s not a villain I look forward to returning.

Check out our coverage of Fantastic Four #30 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]

Fantastic Four #30: Property Damage 29

Posted in Property Damage with tags , , , , , , , on October 16, 2015 by quizlacey
Fantastic Four 30, page 20, panel 2

Fantastic Four 30, page 20, panel 2

Fantasticast Four #30: Property Damage 29

Written by: Stan Lee (A rather nice writer)

Illustrated by: Jack Kirby (A quite noteworthy artist)

Inked by: Chic Stone (A somewhat nifty inker)

Lettered by: Art Simek (An occasionally neat letterer)

Steady on, Ben. You may be angry with Diablo for partially restoring your humanity, deceiving the world, enslaving his neighbours, and all sorts of dodgy stuff that would make the CIA look on with envious eyes, but that’s an antique suit of armour you’re crushing up like aluminium foil. Those things are worth a decent penny, and as we know, the Fantastic Four have their fair share of cash flow issues. You’re literally crushing financial security in your giant, rocky fists. This is the road that leads to having to deal with Collins on a monthly basis!

Check out our coverage of Fantastic Four #30 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]

Fantastic Four #30: Reed’s Stretchy Body 80

Posted in It's Clobberin' Time with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 4, 2015 by quizlacey
Fantastic Four #30, page 7, panel 1

Fantastic Four #30, page 7, panel 1

Fantasticast Four #30: Reed’s Stretchy Body 80

Written by: Stan Lee (A rather nice writer)

Illustrated by: Jack Kirby (A quite noteworthy artist)

Inked by: Chic Stone (A somewhat nifty inker)

Lettered by: Art Simek (An occasionally neat letterer)

It’s hard to work out just how Ben was able to knot Reed around the pillar so effectively. I can’t quite imagine that Reed would have been this pliant, or that he couldn’t undo the knotting all by himself. Still, it makes for a nice, fun, energetic image.

Or, it would, if it wasn’t for the strange depiction of Reed. We’re still in the era when Jack Kirby would happily use 6-9 panel pages, resulting in his art feeling more cramped than we are used to seeing it today. But there’s an almost complete lack of definition on Reed’s face, presumably as a result of trying to fit the entire Fantastic Four in a 1/6th page panel. It’s unfortunate, but it really throws off the entire image.

Check out our coverage of Fantastic Four #30 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]

Fantastic Four #30: The Humanity Of Benjamin J. Grimm 10(ish)

Posted in The Humanity Of Benjamin J. Grimm with tags , , , , , , , on September 2, 2015 by quizlacey
Fantastic Four #30, page 5, panel 8

Fantastic Four #30, page 5, panel 8

Fantasticast Four #30: The Humanity Of Benjamin J. Grimm 10(ish)

Written by: Stan Lee (A rather nice writer)

Illustrated by: Jack Kirby (A quite noteworthy artist)

Inked by: Chic Stone (A somewhat nifty inker)

Lettered by: Art Simek (An occasionally neat letterer)

I guess this one counts, even though it’s not a full return to human form. One of the central conceits of this issue is that Diablo’s alchemy is able to partially restore Ben’s human form, reducing his monstrous exterior to little more than a severe skin complaint, whilst retaining a large portion of The Thing’s strength. In the way of all such hokum, the reversion proves to be temporary, and appears to come with some kind of mental persuasion. Ben returns to his Thing form after only 5 pages.

What astonishes me is that Reed never went back to Diablo’s alchemy to see if this temporary cure could be used as the base for a permanent one. Despite Diablo’s nefarious intentions, he is able to partially reverse the transformation, and for an extended period of time. Unlike Reed’s one-time use and temporarily effective cures, Diablo appears to be able to offer a workable solution that could be developed further. I guess this is counted as invalid due to it being created by a villain…

Check out our coverage of Fantastic Four #30 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]

Fantastic Four #30: Reed’s Stretchy Body 79

Posted in Reed's Stretch Body with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 5, 2015 by quizlacey
Fantastic Four #30, page 1

Fantastic Four #30, page 1

Fantasticast Four #30: Reed’s Stretchy Body 79

Written by: Stan Lee (A rather nice writer)

Illustrated by: Jack Kirby (A quite noteworthy artist)

Inked by: Chic Stone (A somewhat nifty inker)

Lettered by: Art Simek (An occasionally neat letterer)

I have no idea what’s going on with Reed on this page. On first glance, it’s pretty simple – he’s using his stretching powers to get above the undergrowth to see ahead. But on closer look, things just don’t seem right. Reed’s belt line is depicted as being below Sue’s crotch, when he’s normally depicted as being taller than her. So, should I presume that in order to stretch his upper body, Reed had to shrink his lower?

Normally, Reed maintains the general proportions of his body whilst stretching. If using his body to bridge the gap between two skyscrapers, his beltline will remain at the middle of his body, and his limbs will maintain similar sizes. I’m really not sure why he’s chosen to ignore those proportions here – just look at the difference in size between his two arms – but it’s unsettling to see him break the ‘rules’ of his stretching.

Check out our coverage of Fantastic Four #30 on our thirty-third episode: Bad Horse, Bad Horse, with special guest host David Walker

[audio http://traffic.libsyn.com/ffcast/FF_Episode_33.mp3]
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